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More native animals move into High St

23 May, 2019

A pair of wandering wombats have found a home in High St as part of the reconstruction works.

The Parent and Baby wombat watch over the pedestrian crossing near Sesame Lane and were specially commissioned to complement the echidnas that feature in the northern end of the street.

Artist Dean Bowen sculpted the brass wombats and echidnas with the large parent wombat weighing 150 kilograms. The Lavington Library Owl is one of Bowen’s commissions.

The wombats and echidnas are cast from bronze, are robust and considered appealing to all audiences. They can be climbed on, touched, sit next to and have a photo taken with.

A second Ken Raff piece - Unconditional - will be placed near Woodland Grove.

Similar in style to Raff's piece How Deep Is ... which features in the northern end, the laser-cut silhouette of a boy with his dog speaks of man's best friend's unconditional love.

The Wodonga artist is well-known for his Porta sculpture near the river on the Lincoln Causeway.

Bollards with a reference to the city's rail history will line the centre of High St.

The 30 steel bollards by artist Vicki Luke reference an icon of train travel, the train ticket, and the long journeys that railway travel enabled. The ticket wraps around the bollard shape, with the torn edge of the ticket at the top to enliven the profile of the bollard.

The inclusion of functional pieces and points of interest make the street an interesting and attractive place to walk, gather and be and ensure it is more than just asphalt, paver and bins.is a place to enjoy, it should be filled with interesting spaces to stroll and to meet friends and we know that beautiful streets attract people.“I think they will be a fantastic addition to our main street.

A second set of seating banks, designed in the shape of a rail turning triangle, will also be a place of people to pause and gather, with a nod to the city’s rail history and bookend High St.

The seating banks, designed by Kylie Bickle, are made from weathered steel, railway sleepers and concrete.

The inclusion of public art and functional pieces was a part of the funding agreement with the Australian Government for the four-year project.